Posts in category Sequencing

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A Look Back at 2010 at the JCVI…

As the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) soars into its 19th year, we reflect on the past year of highlights and accomplishments to mark the close 2010 and look forward to more significant scientific advances in 2011.

JCVI Top 10 of 2010 …

1. First Synthetic Cell: Fifteen years in the making, 2010 brought to bear with huge anticipation the successful construction of the first self-replicating, synthetic bacterial cell. The work was published in Science in May. The synthetic cell called Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 is the proof of principle that genomes can be designed in the computer, chemically made in the laboratory and transplanted into a recipient cell to produce a new self-replicating cell controlled only by an artificial genome. Although the first synthetic cell was not designed to produce a specific bioproduct, the team has shown that this can be done and the potential benefits are numerous. The research team, lead by JCVI President Craig Venter, Hamilton Smith, Clyde Hutchison, and Daniel Gibson, envision a future where the rapid design and production of biological products using synthetic biology techniques will be used to produce clean fuels, medicines, and other bioproducts. Throughout the course of this work, the JCVI Policy group has extensively engaged in outside review of the ethical and societal implications of this work, including advising the new Presidential Commission on Bioethics on their recommendations for oversight.

M. mycoides JCVI-syn1

M. mycoides JCVI-syn1

2. Synthetic Vaccines: Following on the heels of the announcement of the first synthetic cell, the company Synthetic Genomics Inc. and JCVI announced in October the formation of a new company, Synthetic Genomics Vaccines Inc. (SGVI). The privately held company is focused on developing next generation vaccines that can be rapidly produced and tested, which is especially important for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. SGVI also announced a three-year collaboration with Novartis to apply synthetic genomics technologies to accelerate the production of the influenza (flu) seed strains required for vaccine manufacturing. The seed strain is the starter culture of a virus, and is the base from which larger quantities of the vaccine virus can be grown. Under this collaboration, Novartis and SGVI will work to develop a “bank” of synthetically constructed seed viruses ready to go into production as soon as WHO makes recommendations on the flu strains. The technology could reduce vaccine production time by up to two months, which is particularly critical in the event of a pandemic.

3. Hydra Genome – one of the animal kingdom’s earliest common ancestors: JCVI scientists along with more than 70 other researchers from around the world, have sequenced and analyzed the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, a fresh water member of the cnidaria– stinging animals that include jellyfish, sea anemones and corals. The research, published in the March 14 edition of Nature, was co-led by Ewen F. Kirkness, JCVI, Jarrod A. Chapman, Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and Oleg Simakov, University of California, Berkeley. This is the second sequenced cnidarian genome, following that of a sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, in 2007. The ancestors of these two species diverged more than 500 million years ago, and comparison of their genomes has revealed common features of the earliest animals that gave rise to the diversity of animals on Earth today. The team found clear evidence for conserved genome structure between the Hydra and other animals, like humans. Unexpectedly, the sequencing also revealed a novel bacterium that lives in close association with the Hydra.

4. Uncovering the Human Microbiome: Microbes are living within and on the human body and this collective community is called the human microbiome. JCVI Scientists, as one component of the large scale NIH Roadmap Human Microbiome Project, and along with colleagues at three other genome centers sequenced the genomes of ~180 microbes from the human body, published in the May 21 edition of Science. At the JCVI we anticipate sequencing an additional 400 species over the next few months. Colleagues at the JCVI are also using single cell approaches to isolate new strains that have not been cultured – isolates whose genomes will also be completely sequenced. The role these microbes play in human health and disease is still relatively unknown and these approaches are allowing us to gain a greater understanding of these enigmatic species.

5. Body Louse Genome: A global research team led by Ewen Kirkness and colleagues from JCVI published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in June describing the sequencing and analysis of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus, a human parasite responsible for the transmission of bacteria that cause epidemic typhus, relapsing fever and trench fever. Detailed analysis of the genome was then conducted by a large international group of 71 scientists, coordinated by Barry Pittendrigh, University of Illinois, and Professor Evgeny Zdobnov, University of Geneva Medical School. Comparative studies of the body louse genome with other species revealed features that will enhance our understanding of the relationships between disease-vector insects, the pathogens they transmit, and the human hosts. In addition to the targeted louse genome, the project unexpectedly yielded the complete genome sequence of a bacterial species, Riesia, that lives in close association with lice, and which is essential for survival of the insects. The researchers believe that the genome will be a valuable reference for evolutionary studies of insect species, especially in the areas related to insect growth and development.

6. Castor Bean Genome Sequencing: A research team co-led by Agnes P. Chan and colleagues from JCVI and Jonathan Crabtree and others at the Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, published the sequence and analysis of the castor bean (Ricinus communis) genome in Nature Biotechnology in August. Because of the potential use of castor bean as a biofuel and its production of the potent toxin ricin, the team focused efforts on analysis of genes related to oil and ricin production. The analyses could be important for comparative studies with other oilseed crops, and could also allow for genetic engineering of castor bean to produce oil without ricin. Identifying and understanding the ricin–producing gene family in castor bean will be important in preventing and dealing with potential bioterrorism events. Genomics enables enhanced diagnostic and forensic methods for the detection of ricin and precise identification of strains and geographical origins. As a next step, the group suggests further comparative genomic studies with the close relative cassava, a major crop in the developing world, to further elucidate their disease resistance aspects.

7. Science Education: JCVI was an Official Partner of the inaugural USA Science and Engineering Festival held on the National Mall in Washington, DC in October. The Festival, which was the country’s first national science festival, included over 500 of the country’s leading science and engineering organizations with the aim to reignite the interest of our nation’s youth in the sciences. The JCVI ‘Discover Genomes’ Bus was showcased during a two-day expo and some of the research being done at JCVI was presented to around 1700 visitors by our scientists and staff.

There were lines all day!

8. Viral Genomics– In 2010 the JCVI has published over 1600 influenza genomes and over 75% of all published flu genomes to date have been sequenced by the JCVI, totaling over 6000 genomes. This year the diversity of viral genomes we have sequenced has significantly expanded under the NIH Genomic Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases contract. Some of the projects include viruses causing diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, encephalitis, SARS, and the common cold, just to name a few. The viral group has annotated and published 79 Rotavirus (stomach flu) and 33 Coronavirus genomes (includes SARS and common cold) this year and many more will be published in 2011. The pace of sequencing and finishing genomes has also increased this year as a result of adoption of nextgen platforms (e.g. Illumina/454 and Illumina/Solexa) and the development of more efficient methodologies to increase productivity while reducing costs.

9. Marine Microbial Genome Sequencing Project: JCVI scientists have continued their quest to isolate and sequencing microbes living in global ocean waters to discover new genes and enzymes, and to help understand the role microbes play in the ocean ecosystem. Shibu Yooseph, Kenneth Nealson and colleagues at JCVI published an analysis of 137 known marine microbial genomes living in the global ocean surface in Nature in November. These genomes were compared to metagenomic samples of ocean waters of 10.97 million sequences of JCVI’s Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenomic data and thousands of 16S rRNA sequences. The marine genomes were collected as part of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation-funded Marine Microbial Genome Sequencing Project, a project coordinated by JCVI that has a primary goal of obtaining whole genome sequences of ecologically important microbes from a variety of diverse, global marine environments. The work provides a good example of combining metagenomic data with sequenced genomes data to study microbial communities and to generate testable hypotheses in microbial ecology.

10. Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: On December 17th 2010 Sorcerer II arrived in Florida after spending the last two years with her crew collecting samples in The Baltic, Mediterranean and Black Seas. Funded generously by the Beyster Family Foundation Fund, The San Diego Foundation, and Life Technologies Foundation, Sorcerer II has sailed ~28,000 nautical miles since departing San Diego in March 2009. During this time 212 samples were collected and over 5,100 liters of sea water was filtered and sent to JCVI for analysis of the microbial life contained within these samples. The JCVI established strong collaborations with scientists in all 16 countries in which samples were collected, which will lead to joint publications and future collaborative studies in the new year. Read more.

Sunrise in the Ligurian Sea

Looking Forward to 2011…

Ten-year anniversary of the Human Genome Project: To commemorate the anniversary of the publications of the first human genome sequences in 2001, JCVI and Nature are hosting a conference and celebration in February 2011 titled – Human Genomics: The Next 10 Years. The conference will look forward to the promises of human genomics for the next 10 years, with sessions on medical advances related to genomics; the technological and ethical challenges of human genomics; personalized and familial genomics; the human microbiome project; variation in the human genome; and making sense of the genetic code. This conference will be a great way to jump into the new year and inspire the grandiose ideas and achievements that genomic scientists will accomplish over the years to come.

Entamoeba histolytica research presented at the Molecular Parasitology Meeting

Entamoeba histolytica causes invasive intestinal and extraintestinal infections, known as amoebiasis, in about 50 million people and still remains a significant cause of human death in developing countries. However, for unknown reasons, fewer than 10% of E. histolytica infections are symptomatic (causing symptoms such as diarrhea, dysentery or liver abscess). The J. Craig Venter Institute is among the institutions awarded the NIAID Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCID) contracts to provide high-quality genome sequencing and high-throughput genotyping of NIAID Category A-C priority pathogens.

Photo of Entamoeba histolytica

Entamoeba histolytica in the trophozoite stage.

A GSCID project led at JCVI by Dr. Elisabet Caler includes performing whole-genome sequencing of Entamoeba phenotypic variants from symptomatic, asymptomatic and liver abscess-causing strains chosen to include a range of clinical manifestations and taken from human cases, as well as strains grown under different conditions. Our objective is to develop a genome-wide landscape of Entamoeba diversity to understand how sequence variations in the parasite relate to pathogenicity (ability to cause disease) and clinical outcome.

The Molecular Parasitology Meeting held at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA last week provided a window into the exciting science of Parasitology.  The keynote speaker, Fotis Kafatos, spoke on “Major Challenges to Global Health in the Tropics and Beyond–Insect Vectors of Malaria and Other Parasitic or Viral Diseases.”  Dr. Kafatos stressed that a multi-pronged approach to the control of malaria is necessary to prevent the devastating loss of life that malaria causes.

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A view of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

The many excellent papers and posters provided an overview of the field, including   Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, the trypanosomes, Giardia lamblia, Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Schistosoma species, Babesia bovis, and associated vectors.  Topics spanned basic biology, drug design, sequencing and host-pathogen interactions.

I presented an overview of the Entamoeba sequencing project at the meeting.   Discussions as a result of the presentation included questions about the details of sequencing and handling the next-generation sequencing data.   We had animated discussions about methods for assembly of the DNA sequences, including reference-guided vs de novo assembly.   Many attendees were impressed with JCVI’s open-source METAREP metagenomic tool (J. Goll, et al., Bioinformatics 2010).  Determination of the best methods for the analysis of differences in the clinical isolates generated much discussion.  Entamoeba researchers see the sequences as a great resource and are looking forward to being able to mine the data.  One, from India, was very excited that he was going to have about 15 times the resources he has had in the past, since he has had only had one genome to mine up until now.

The Molecular Parasitology Meeting was an excellent venue for scientific exchange.  The Entamoeba histolytica GSCID project will help us understand the pathogenicity of Entamoeba histolytica, and has the potential to save lives in developing countries.

HMP Consortium – St. Louis Missouri

Human Microbiome Project Consortium – September 2010 – St Louis, Missouri

We received warm welcome messages from Dr George Weinstock and Dr Jane Petersen as well as a humorous welcome from Dr Larry Shapiro, Dean of Washington University Medical School. 

It was wonderful to see so many scientists come together to share the progress on their individual HMP related demonstration projects.  Our own demonstration project with Dr Zhiheng Pei, involving the esophagus microbiome and how that relates to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), was quite unique compared to the other projects as we were the only group to focus on the correlation between bacterial population and a form of cancer. 

With over 400 participants and 59 speakers, the conference was quite successful and very interesting.  JCVI Director Dr Karen Nelson did a wonderful job moderating one of the segments.  Dr Roger Lasken also gave a thorough presentation on his lab’s single cell approaches to genomic sequencing of uncultureable bacteria.  Johannes Goll gave a great presentation on his recent work with an open source tool called METAREP (recently published in Bioinformatics 8/26/2010), which is designed to help scientists with analyzing annotated metagenomic data.  And Dan Haft presented his interesting work with algorithmically tuning protein families from reference genomes for systems discovery. 

Overall the conference was quite interesting and informative.  I continue to wish all of the participating sequencing centers, PIs, and others involved with the HMP much success with their projects. 

Hope to see everyone in Vancouver!!!

DNA microarrays vs RNAseq — The winner and new heavyweight champion is?… It’s a draw.

In the past year or so there have been several articles stating that the death of microarray technology is growing near. These proclamations are due to the more recently introduced methodology referred to as RNAseq. At first glance I wrote these claims off as being silly and premature. Over time though I am starting to appreciate that while the claim is still clearly wrong, the issue isn’t about technology displacement at all. My group works on a wide variety of gene expression problems ranging from the simple in vitro microbial gene expression studies to problems involving metagenomic samples of enormous complexity (http://pfgrc.jcvi.org). In my experience, the decision of whether to use DNA microarrays or RNAseq seems straight-forward and unambiguous. In reality the two technologies couldn’t be more complementary. Given the simple in vitro gene expression study as an example, the low cost, short turn-around time, exceptional quantitative accuracy and ease of data generation all make the glass slide microarray the clear choice.

About three years ago our laboratory began thinking about how to examine gene expression of pathogenic bacteria in the context of host infection. The challenge here is related to assay sensitivity since any RNA preparation derived from such an infection will yield host RNAs in an abundance 100 to 1000 times greater than that obtained from the infectious agent. Labeled RNAs from such an experiment would yield little useful information about the bacterial gene expression using standard DNA microarray procedures. This represents a clear case for RNAseq. The bewildering number of sequence reads we have come to enjoy from NextGen sequencing platforms is only going to get better. The extra bonus of applying RNAseq is that both the host and infectious agent can be profiled at the same time. There are still many technical problems to work out for routine use of RNAseq, such as effective rRNA removal and the development of appropriate data analysis tools, but the effort required seems quite justifiable.

I can think of only one application that is beginning to take on momentum where an investigator may truly ponder which strategy makes the most sense to apply. The approach is one that mimics EST sequencing as a means of defining genes and gene limits. Our ability to properly identify coding DNA sequences (CDS) in genomes ranges from, very good to relatively poor, depending on the genome in question. Members of the parasite research community, to name one, have struggled with this problem often. Generally speaking, substantial over-calling of genes occurs making it difficult for scientists to begin down the path of functional characterization of their favorite genome. We have worked with such groups recently to provide an independent means of substantiating gene calls via evidence of RNA expression. The design of such studies involves generating RNAs from a wide variety of experimental conditions to enhance the frequency for evidence based gene calls. DNA microarrays designed as a low or high density tiling array can be acquired at a reasonable cost and with good experimental outcomes. The case for applying RNAseq rests on the increased ability to detect transcripts that are expressed at low levels that defy routine detection using DNA microarrays.

In summary, I find very few instances where one might reasonably stop to wonder which technology are best suited for the biological/technical problem at hand. When sensitivity isn’t limiting, use DNA microarrays. When sensitivity is everything, look toward the short read sequencing technologies. In the end it turns out that it wasn’t really a contest at all. We should all feel fortunate that each strategy has its appropriate time and place for use. Those researchers, like myself, that have invested much time and effort working with DNA microarrays have nothing to fear, we just have more options now. This is a good thing to say the least. Most of our gene expression work is supported through a contract from NIAID to the PFGRC under contract N01-A115447.

Scott Peterson http://www.jcvi.org/cms/about/bios/speterson/

Professor, JCVI

Scientific Director, PFGRC at JCVI