Posts in category Education

JCVI Hosts South African Scientists to Share Microbiome Research Techniques

Two scientists from the University of Cape Town, South Africa have joined Dr. Bill Nierman’s lab for the next month as part of NIH’s Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Initiative, a training program designed to build out technical biological skills in the African research community. This training relates specifically to developing techniques around the area of microbiome analysis, a relatively new field in the biological sciences.

Microbiome analysis for the collaborative study is looking at entire community of microorganisms in the respiratory tract of South African infants to better understand how the microbiome is associated with infant pneumonia and wheezing episodes. The expectation is that the organisms that reside in the infant respiratory tract will provide protection from or a predisposition to the pneumonia or wheezing episodes.

 

The Nierman Group

The Nierman group left to right Sarah Lucas, Bill Nierman, Shantelle Claassen, Mamadou Kaba and Stephanie Mounaud (unpictured Jyoti Shanker and Lilliana Losada) welcomes visiting scientists Ms. Classeen and Dr. Kaba from University of Cape Town for a month long training in microbiome sequencing and analysis.

Mamado Kaba, MD, PhD and colleague Shantelle Claassen from the University of Cape Town will be working closely under the guidance of JCVI’s Stephanie Mounaud who is functioning as the project manager and coordinating the laboratory components of a similar project at JCVI studying the microbiomes of inafnts in the Philippines and also in South Africa. These studies are sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The training will focus initially on preparing samples for DNA sequencing on a modern DNA sequencing platform, the Illumina MiSeq instrument. Once the sequence reads are off the sequencer, the instructional focus will shift to analysis of the reads by means of an informatics pipeline that develop phylogenies, or family trees, of the microbes that are obtained from the infant respiratory tract so that the abundance and relatedness of the microbes can be established. The bioinformatics training will be provided by Jyoti Shankar, the statistical analyst working on the Gates Foundation Project.

Mamadou Kaba is a Wellcome Trust Fellow working in the Division of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town. Mamadou’s research interests include the molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases and the study of human microbiome in healthy and disease conditions. He has contributed in establishing a new research group conducting studies on how the composition of the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal, and the house dust microbial communities influences the development of respiratory diseases.

Prior to joining the University of Cape Town, Mamadou worked as Research Associate at the Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, Timone University Hospital, Marseille, France, where he studied the epidemiological characteristics of infection with hepatitis E virus in South-eastern France.

Shantelle Claassen is pursuing a Masters degree in the Division of Medical Microbiology at the University of Cape Town. She has completed a BSc (Med) Honours degree in Infectious Diseases and Immunology at the University of Cape Town, during which she examined the relative efficacy of extracting bacterial genomic DNA from human faecal samples using five commercial DNA extraction kits. The DNA extraction kits were evaluated based on their ability to efficiently lyse bacterial cells, cause minimal DNA shearing, produce reproducible results and ensure broad-range representation of bacterial diversity.

Mamadou and Shantelle are currently involved in an additional prospective, longitudinal study of which the primary objective is to investigate the association between fecal bacterial communities and recurrent wheezing during the first two years of life.

The 2014 Summer Internship Application is Open and Announcing the Genomics Scholar Program

The 2014 Summer Internship Application is now open.   Last summer, we hosted 49 interns from a pool of 424 applicants. They presented their research in the First Annual Summer Internship Poster Sessions held in San Diego and Rockville. The posters were judged by a team of volunteer JCVI scientists and the poster sessions were open to all employees, interns and their guests to share what great work they all participated in this summer.

 

 

2013 Intern Poster Session

2013 Intern Poster Session

We are also excited to announce the new Genomics Scholar Program beginning this summer and also accepting applications.  The Genomic Scholar Program (GSP) is a targeted research experience program to community college students in Rockville. Our program incorporates multiple avenues of support for students through the research experience with the Principal Investigators as mentors, and supplemental professional development provided by the JCVI.  Additionally, selected students will have the opportunity to participate in undergraduate research conferences.

The GSP is supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under award number R25DK098111.

Thule, Greenland – Day One

Arrived at Thule, Greenland after a 5 hr flight from Copenhagen.  It was pretty interesting seeing a long line of people all getting on a flight that was headed to a part of the world that usually has less than 600 people there at any given time.  Arrival was pretty straightforward, no jetway, no customs, no LCD screens telling you where to pick up your bag.  Just a few military personnel checking your documents to ensure that you have the approval from the Danish government and USAF to be on base.  First impression getting off the plane…it’s cold.  Not as cold as I expected it to be but it was just 90 degrees F when I left home a few days ago.  Today’s high was 39 degrees F.  Standing in the sun it’s not so bad but when the wind starts blowing it turns into a recipe for chapped lips and windburn.  Oh and did I mention the massive mosquitos here?  Not much wildlife in this part of the world but the mosquitos outnumbers the vertebrates probably a million to one.  They are also VERY aggressive; they even swarmed the trucks while we were driving around the base.  We were shown our living quarters, which were very nice, kind of reminded me of living in the dorms during undergrad.  There are individual rooms and a shared bathroom on each floor.  We toured the various sites that our collaborator Slava Epstein already pointed out as good sampling sites that vary in vegetation and proximity to water.  The land here is quite desolate, not much green, mostly moss and small shrubs growing.  Traditional trees are nonexistent but “ground trees” are actually common.  They are trees that grow outward on the grass and not upward.  The rest resembles pictures taken by the mars rover.  As the day goes by I noticed the sun was circling and I came to the realization that the typical artic summer was happening right in front of me.  The sun literally circles and will not go down until around September.  It was quite odd, getting in bed at midnight and seeing the sun still in the sky.  Tomorrow will be more interesting since we will be going further away from base to sample additional areas. 

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Thule, Greenland – Day Three

Day three started with me missing breakfast. It seems that folks around here only eat breakfast between 5am and 8am. Today was a very rough day for sampling.  About an hour drive to the area near the site, about a three-mile hike to one spot another half-mile hike to another spot followed by the three and a half mile hike back to the truck. We sampled “rich” soil and “rich” soil from a lake. These two sites were sampled and categorized as “rich” due to the abundance of vegetation around and near the sites. The area surrounding Thule is very desolate so I can imagine the plants have a hard enough time growing.  It would be very interesting to see what microbes are present in these two sites to allow such vegetation to grow; even more interesting to see how water affects the microbial population. Samples were frozen once we got back to the on site lab. A small portion was saturated with AllProtect to ensure preservation of RNA for transcriptomics analysis.

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The day ended with a lecture from another NSF grant recipient to install a telescope on the Greenlandic ice cap. It was an interesting idea to coordinate radio imaging from other telescopes around the world to look at quantum singularities that were very far away. After speaking to some of the other scientists here I found out that our group, which includes myself and our collaborators Slava Epstein and Dawoon Jung, were the ONLY Microbiologists on the base. Everyone else was either a Geologist, Environmental Scientist, Astronomer, or Meteorologist. It was great to hear about everyone else’s projects.

The Next Generation Science Standards are Ready for Review

The second draft is ready for public comment through January 29th. Please be sure to take some time to review.

http://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards

Plant Bioinformatics Workshop

JCVI recently held its 3rd Annual Plant Bioinformatics Workshop from July 15-19th. During the week-long workshop, 20 scientists from the Plant Research community visited JCVI and learned many aspects of Bioinformatics from the members of Chris Town’s Plant Genome group. Attendees included undergraduate and graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, research scientists and faculty at various Universities throughout the United States as well as a biotech company. In addition to the on-site participants, we had 5 additional participants attend the workshop via WebEx. The virtual participants had the opportunity to sit in on the lectures and complete the hands on exercises by logging into an Amazon Cloud instance, which was set up specifically for this purpose. The topics covered during the workshop included UNIX tools for Bioinformatics, Genome Assembly, Structural and Functional Annotation, RNA-seq assembly and analysis and SNPs. In addition to JCVI’s instructors, we had additional sections covered by external instructors. Eric Lyons (University of Arizona and iPlant) presented on Comparative Genomics and the iPlant Infrastructure and Ann Loraine (UNC Charlotte) presented on Integrated Genome Browser. All sessions contained a hands-on component so the students would have the opportunity to use the tools that we discussed during the lecture portion.  Watch our website for future offerings!

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JCVI Internship Information for 2013 Is Ready

We are now accepting applications for the 2013 Summer Internship Program.  We are excited to be able to continue to inspire young scientists!  Last year, we received 546 applications.  Of which, thirty-one interns were selected to work in diverse areas.

 

2012 San Diego Summer Interns

2012 San Diego Summer Interns

 

2012 Rockville Summer Interns

2012 Rockville Summer Interns

 

Some of the intern projects were:

  • Isolation and Characterization of Electricity Generating Bacteria
  • Characterizing the Microbial Population of Rabbit GI Tract
  • Cloning Ureaplasma urealyticum: An Odyssey
  • Comparative Genomics of three isolate strains in the actively serpentinizing Cedars Springs
  • Coronavirus: Amplification of the HE and Spike genes in human coronavirus genomes

The 2013 JCVI Internship Program is open to accept spring and summer applications. The application process includes the submission of a resume, essay and transcripts as one PDF file via our online application site. We do not require letters of recommendation.

Information about the 2013 program can be found at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/education/internship-program/

2012 JCVI Internship Program Is Now Accepting New Applications

Wow! Another year has gone by.  Its hard to think it is November – almost December with the warm weather we have been enjoying.  However it did not start that way.

Halloween Snow in Maryland!

The 2012 JCVI Internship Program is open to accept spring and summer applications. The application process includes the submission of a resume, essay and transcripts as one PDF file via our online application site. We no longer require letters of recommendation.

Information about the 2012 program can be found at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/education/internship-program/

For summer 2011, we received 544 applicants.  Of these applicants, 30 Interns were selected (10 in San Diego and 20 in Rockville):

  • 7 high school students
  • 9 undergraduate students
  • 13 graduate students
  • 1 secondary teacher

The intern projects ranged across the Institute:

  • A lethal set of virulence factors in uropathogenic E. coli ?
  • Expanding genome transplantation: Streptococcus thermophilus
  • Random Assembly for Use in Swapping as a Tool for Genome Minimization
  • Assembling terminators and promoters
  • Developing Galaxy Tools for the Ordination Analysis of Meta-genomic samples

Good luck to all the applicants this year!

The Mobile Lab Is Going to Sunny San Diego

Late one evening in January 2006, the mobile lab pulled into the parking lot at 9704 Medical Center Drive.  It was such an exciting evening!!  Within a few days, we had all the lab supplies on it and began visiting students.  The first school in the Washington Area was Patapsco Middle School in Howard County.  In addition the other inaugural participating schools were Ron Brown Middle School, Hines Junior High School, and Eliot Junior High School in Washington, DC.  Since then, we had the opportunity to bring the mobile lab to thousands of students in the past 5 years.
First Class on the DG! Mobile Lab, January 2006

First Class on the DG! Mobile Lab, January 2006

Today, the mobile lab began its journey across the US to San Diego.  Let us know if you see it on the highway!
 As you may have seen in September, we just broke ground on our new facility in San Diego.  We began offering education programming in San Diego at our temporary facility in 2007 – we have worked with over 30 teachers.  From these relationships, we look forward to bringing the same opportunities to San Diego students we have in the Washington Area.
Students on the DG! Mobile Lab

Students on the DG! Mobile Lab

 With the current economic environment, keeping this program rolling is challenging.  Yet, it is needed more and more in the classroom.  We need your help!  To find out how you can help keep this science program rolling, visit our Giving Page.

The Hill School: Day 2

The day started early Tuesday with first period.  Thirty eager students arrived on the bus to determine the results of the amplification of the DNA they extracted the day before.  The PCR ran overnight, copying part of a conserved gene in plants, RuBisCo, that can be used to identify the species of land plants.

Loading Gels at the Hill School

Loading Gels at the Hill School

 Using gel electrophoresis, we were able to load gels and run them quickly to see the results.  Most students successfully had amplicons – this was a great since they had not ever done DNA extraction or electrophoresis. The samples have been brought back to Rockville for sequencing and will be available for the students to analyze in about two-weeks.
Loading Gels like a Professional at the Hill School

Loading Gels like a Professional at the Hill School

We had a great visit with the students and are curious to see what plants they brought from around campus.

We look forward to working with them again in the future!

To support our Education program visit http://www.jcvi.org/cms/giving/overview