Posts in category Education

J. Craig Venter Institute Education Program Fosters Learning Opportunities with Salisbury University Students and Faculty

Patti Erickson, PhD first connected with the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) in the Fall of 2016 as an associate professor at Salisbury University looking for opportunities to expose undergraduate students to biology outside of the classroom. Soon thereafter, she and a group from Salisbury visited JCVI’s Rockville labs, forging a relationship that would lead her to working in the lab of Sanjay Vashee, PhD as a visiting scientist while on sabbatical.

Her work at JCVI, which is ongoing, is focused on using synthetic biology techniques developed at JCVI to generate partial genomic hybrids of Mycoplasma gallisepticum to facilitate functional analysis of this important poultry pathogen. Serendipitously, Salisbury University is located on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, known for its large-scale chicken breeding and home to Perdue Farms.

Dr. Erickson presenting an overview of the history of JCVI’s Mycoplasma research and her work on the Mycoplasma gallisepticum to the Salisbury University group touring JCVI Rockville.

This past month Dr. Erickson and Salisbury students traveled to San Diego to attend the annual American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) meeting, held in conjunction with the Experimental Biology conference. There, she presented her work involving C. elegans, done while working in the Hawdon Lab at George Washington University, and Salisbury students presented posters on independent research projects.

While in the San Diego area, the group was able to visit JCVI’s La Jolla campus, where they were hosted by Gene Tan, PhD. They visited with leading synthetic biology experts including John Glass, PhD, who gave an overview of the minimal cell project, followed by Nobel Laureate Hamilton Smith, MD and Clyde Hutchison, PhD. They also toured the facility, which is an ultra-energy efficient laboratory.

Salisbury University students and faculty, and J. Craig Venter Institute staff gather at the end of the day’s activities at JCVI’s Rockville location.

Salisbury students and faculty again visited JCVI Rockville this past week for a full day of lectures and demonstrations. JCVI’s Stephanie Mounaud presented on an infant microbiome project; David Haft presented on hidden Markov modeling approaches; and Dr. Erickson gave an overview of JCVI’s Mycoplasma research and how her work on the M. gallisepticum genome hybrids fits into it.

Students from Salisbury University tour JCVI’s Rockville lab. Left: Dr. Chandran shows the group mammalian cell lines. Right: Dr. Yu discusses mass spectroscopy.

Other scientists led a lab tour, including Yanbao Yu, PhD, who explained how mass spectroscopy can be used to identify and sort peptides for proteomics studies. Agnes Chan, PhD showed the group the MinIon nanopore sequencer and discussed forthcoming technologies that will make sequencing financially feasible at smaller universities. Suchismita Chandran, PhD discussed the importance of mammalian tissue cultures for studying viruses and showed the group several cell lines, while Bryan Frank discussed the airplane microbiome project. The visit culminated with Nacyra Assad-Garcia describing the challenges of transplanting entire Mycoplasma genomes.

The visits were organized by JCVI’s education manager, Sarah Grimshaw. Educational outreach and community engagement are part of JCVI’s core mission. JCVI is committed to enhancing scientific literacy, increasing enthusiasm in science, and developing the next generation of genetic and genomic scientists. To learn more, visit JCVI’s Educational Outreach page.

BioVision Alexandria 2018

The BioVision Alexandria conference convened at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, in Alexandria, Egypt this past April. The Bibliotheca Alexandrina is a commemoration of the Ancient Library of Alexandria and an attempt to rekindle the global cultural and scholarship role of the library.

Dr. Nelson delivering the keynote address at BioVision Alexandria.

With this backdrop, BioVison joined scientific and other leaders spanning disciplines to meet and listen to presentations on the most pressing challenges relating to poverty and human health. Among the distinguished participants was JCVI president, Karen Nelson, PhD, and senior scientist at JCVI and associate professor at the American University in Cairo, Ahmed Moustafa, PhD.

In 2015, through the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA), a set of seventeen sustainable development goals (SDGs) was outlined and adopted by the international community. In keeping with these targets, BioVision’s theme this year was “New Life Sciences: Towards SDGs.”

Dr. Nelson meeting with BioVision conference participants.

In her keynote speech, Dr. Nelson spoke broadly about the impact of genomics and advances in microbiome research that may have significant impact on our ability to achieve and sustain these goals. Dr. Nelson also met with next-generation scientists, MS and PhD students from the Middle East and Africa and discussed topics from scientific and technical to career advising and opportunities.

Dr. Karen Nelson and attendees of her lecture at the American University in Cairo.

Other conference topics included open data, precision medicine, drug discovery, environmental genomics, synthetic biology, as well as the supporting framework provided through policy and economic reforms. The conference also focused on the need to foster scientific discovery in developing countries. Of the 25 represented nations in the speaking lineup, about half were developing countries.

After the conference, Dr. Nelson visited the American University in Cairo (AUC) in New Cairo where she gave a public lecture on genomics and health. The lecture went over the history of genomic technologies and discoveries and the envisioned future role of genomics in clinical diagnosis and therapeutics.

During her visit to AUC, Dr. Nelson met Dr. Yehia Zakaria Gad, the head of Ancient DNA in the Egyptian Museum. They discussed several potential venues of collaboration between JCVI and the Egyptian Museum.

Dr. Nelson also joined Dr. Hassan El-Fawal, Dean of AUC’s School of Sciences and Engineering, and graduate students from the engineering and sciences departments for a discussion on the critical role of bridging communications between scientists and engineers to advance improvements to the quality of human life.

J. Craig Venter Institute Inspires Kids on “Take Your Child to Work Day”

Last month when my kindergarten-aged daughter brought home a note from school to dress up as their future career choice, I was pleasantly surprised to hear from her that she aspired to be a scientist just like me. So, we dug through my clothes and found her an old lab coat and decorated the collars with some biology-themed pins. When I heard JCVI was hosting a “take your child to work day” I knew she would be very excited to visit. She and the other children were greeted with hands-on activities meticulously planned by JCVI’s education manager, Sarah Grimshaw. Sixteen elementary and middle school children accompanied their parents to work at the Rockville, MD site to learn about JCVI’s research.

To kick off the day Brett Pickett, PhD opened with a genomics primer.

The event included talks and hands-on experiments that were both informational and engaging for the children. JCVI scientists Brett Pickett, PhD and Hernan Lorenzi, PhD described some of the interesting research being conducted at the institute. The children were introduced to the concepts including DNA, nucleus, and the cell. They were especially excited when they were invited to stain the nucleus of human cells themselves and view them under the microscope with me and David Brown, PhD.

The highlight of the day may have been when the children actually extracted DNA from strawberries in a tube. The realization that their food is made up of DNA was a thought-provoking fact that they mulled over during lunch. Of course, nothing could top the double helix model of the DNA that they created for dessert with Twizzler candy and marshmallows. The kids were very proud of their DNA art. Peppered through all the DNA activity, the children also learned about bacteria and fungi, and the consequence of personal hygiene through hand-washing experiments with Stephanie Mounaud. They also enjoyed making slime and elephant toothpaste and discussed about the significance of chemical reactions.

Sarah Grimshaw and David Brown, PhD work with the group on extracting DNA from strawberries.

The children were very excited about their day and seemed to enjoy their experience at JCVI. Several of them were overheard saying that it was one of the best days of their lives – a sentiment that the staff and scientists at JCVI also shared. While the JCVI “take your child to work day” was a successful event, I didn’t realize how much of an impact it had made on the minds of these kids until I heard my daughter describe the double helix model of the DNA to her dad later in the evening with all its components and structural details. She even enthusiastically declared that she wanted to work as a scientist at JCVI (just like her mother), which made me appreciate JCVI’s commitment to educational outreach efforts and public engagement.

Still excited from the day’s events, the group poses with their double helix candy models.

With the current environment of science education, it has become critical for institutions like JCVI to take up the mantle to help provide the knowledge, resources, and inspiration to the younger generation in the STEM field. As a parent and a scientist, I am glad that my child had the opportunity to experience some interesting science during this event, and hope to continue to be a part of JCVI’s mission to motivate budding scientists.

Suchismita Chandran, PhD
Staff Scientist, Department of Synthetic Biology and Bioenergy, JCVI

J. Craig Venter Institute Teaches Students about Genomics at Annual High Tech Fair

In January, JCVI was one of more than 40 San Diego STEM-related organizations who participated in the Fleet Science Center’s annual High Tech Fair. This year more than 3,000 local middle and high-school students, their teachers, and families descended upon Balboa Park throughout the two-day event to engage in exciting and interactive educational experiences. Students learned about local research being done in a variety of fields and had the opportunity to speak with scientists about career opportunities.

Fleet Science Center’s annual High Tech Fair

Students who visited the JCVI booth learned about the range of our genomics research by engaging in some tasty (or not…) hands-on activities. They participated in a taste-test experiment to learn about one of their own inherited traits by discovering, almost shockingly at times, their phenotype of TAS2R38, a gene that encodes for bitter taste.

To do this they tasted phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), a compound responsible for bitter tastes similar to what is found in Brussel sprouts and cabbage (members of the Brassica family). About 70% of the population are “tasters,” and can taste some degree of bitterness in PTC.

The students then learned why by looking at the different genotypes of tasters and non-tasters by locating the variants in a DNA sequencing read.

A student reaches in for a tasting strip to see if she can detect the bitter tastes of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC).

Lastly, to help alleviate the bitter taste and to help learn about the structure and components of DNA, students built edible double helix models out of red licorice and marshmallows.

Students assemble sweet double helix models to erase any bitterness left from the experiment.

This year’s High Tech Fair was a great success; we had an incredible time talking to students about science and learning about their career aspirations. We are looking forward to next year’s event already!

JCVI Launches New Internship Partnership with Smithsonian Science Education Center

Are you passionate about science education? If so, we have a unique hands-on opportunity for you to be a part of real teams of scientists and educators. This opportunity doesn’t require any previous lab experience, and is open to undergraduate and graduate students in the United States.

The internship will be split between the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) and the Smithsonian Science Education Center (SSEC). At JCVI you will participate in cutting-edge research. This will dovetail into curriculum enhancement previously developed at the SSEC, which aligns with the U.N.’s Global Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs).

This is an excellent opportunity for both science majors who may be interested in pursuing a path in education, and for education majors looking to gain valuable experience in a professional laboratory.

Space-fill drawing of the outside of one Zika virus particle, and a cross-section through another as it interacts with a cell. Image courtesy David Goodsell.

What will do you?

At the JCVI, you will work on a part of a larger project geared towards the development of rapid tests for virus genes that suppress host antiviral defenses. The project, which will focus on the mosquito-borne Zika Virus Disease, will use synthetic biology techniques to help scientists identify virulent strains.

At the SSEC, you will work with curriculum developers and experts in the field of global science education to support the development and rollout of the SSEC’s curriculum module “Zika!,” which helps students understand mosquito-borne diseases through inquiry-based science education methods.

The outcomes of this internship will lead to not only a better understanding of current research being done in the field, but will also result in the development of effective ways to communicate scientific research to the public.

Apply on our website today!

The 2017 JCVI Summer Internship Program

JCVI’s long-running internship program just concluded its summer 2017 session with a well-attended poster symposium held in both its Rockville and La Jolla locations. Eighteen of our interns presented their research in a session open to all JCVI faculty and staff. Montgomery College professors and staff attended, as well to support our Genomic Scholar Program (GSP) Interns in Rockville.

2017 Rockville Interns

2017 Rockville Interns

This past session was one of our most competitive yet, with over 1700 unique candidates applying to the program. A total of 20 interns took part in the program, 10 at each campus. Of the entire intern cohort, eight were part of our Genomic Scholar Internship Program (GSP), which is a 15-month long internship focused on helping community college students transition successfully into a four-year university. This year, the GSP was excited to include a bioinformatics intern into the program for the first time. Four of our GSP interns successfully completed their internship and are continuing their undergraduate careers at various universities, including Georgetown University, University of Maryland and UC Davis. Our remaining GSP cohort will be staying on throughout the academic year as they continue their studies at local universities.

2017 La Jolla Interns

2017 La Jolla Interns

JCVI strives to prepare future scientists by exposing them to multiple facets of scientific research as well as the professional working environment. During our summer internship program, interns not only conduct their own research project and present their findings to the JCVI community, but also are involved in a variety of professional development activities. Our interns participate in a weekly journal club, which exposes them to current scientific literature. There they present and discuss a scientific journal article selected by JCVI mentors. JCVI also holds a weekly intern-only seminar series, where our cohort has the opportunity to learn more about JCVI research, talk with graduate students and learn about different career options in the field of science.

Hands-on informatics training with Rockville interns

Hands-on informatics training with Rockville interns

If you are interested in JCVI’s internship program, please check our website for additional information and updates about our upcoming 2018 summer session.

Summer 2016 Intern Program

Interns in both Rockville, MD and La Jolla, CA participated in our summer 2016 internship program at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). A total of 19 interns were hired for the summer 2016 program, selected from 578 applicants. Of the 19 interns, six interns were part of the Genomic Scholar Program (GSP) that is a transition program focusing on the leap from a community college to a four-year college using a combination of activities including undergraduate research experience with mentoring and professional development. The interns were mentored by JCVI faculty and research scientists. Mentors design a research project for each intern depending on their education and prior research experience.

GSP interns Emily Samuels, Rolande Tra Lou, Erica Ngouajio, Raja Venkatappa (mentor), Claudia Najera, Kat Rocha, Tayah Bolt (from La Jolla) and Kenya Platero gather at JCVI Rockville's poster session.

GSP interns Emily Samuels, Rolande Tra Lou, Erica Ngouajio, Raja Venkatappa (mentor), Claudia Najera, Kat Rocha, Tayah Bolt (from La Jolla) and Kenya Platero gather at JCVI Rockville’s poster session.

The involvement of fellows in individually focused research projects was designed to stimulate interest in biomedical research as well as to develop independent critical thinking and communication skills with other team members. In addition to research activities, throughout the summer interns participated in professional development activities that included:  education on the importance of documenting research activities and maintaining accurate laboratory records,  responsible conduct of research, the art of reading scientific literature (interns participated in weekly science journal clubs that aimed to teach how to dissect and interpret scientific literature), and scientific presentations. All the interns participated in JCVI internal presentations and presented their summer research as a poster.

Summer 2016 Interns gather for a picture in the courtyard at JCVI La Jolla.

Summer 2016 Interns gather for a picture in the courtyard at JCVI La Jolla.

A brief summary of 2016 interns summer research projects and their mentors are listed below.

Intern Name(s) Research Project Mentor(s)
Roshni Bhattachara Structural implications of unique substitutions found in a paralysis-associated enterovirus D68 clade Richard Scheuermann
Christopher Henderson Assessment of the Contribution of Ascertainment Cohort to the Genetic Architecture of Alzheimer’s Disease Nicholas Schork
Nathan Lian and Anthony Kang Experimental Validation of ChIP-Seq Identified Centremeres Philip Weyman
Rohith Kodukula The Oral Microbiome of Caries in Children: A Study on Twins Andres Gomez
Ian Lamb Identifying Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Markers in gut microbes Manolito Torralba
Stephanie Mountain Hydrogen peroxide tolerance variation among different isolates of Acinetobacter baumannli Mark Adams and Meredith Wright
Kathryn O’Nell Cell-Type Clustering in Cortical Brain Cells via differential Expression Analysis of Single Nuclei Richard Scheuermann
Josefa Rivera Identifying new promoter elements in Phaeodactylum tricornutum Vincent Bielinski, Philip Weyman, and Chris Dupont
Jennifer Tuman Pan-Cancer Analysis of Somatic Mutations in DNA Damage Repair Genes Alexandra Buckley  and Nicholas Schork
Ben Grimes Using Synthetic Biology Methods to Engineer Herpes Simples Virus-1 and Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri Genomes Suchismita Chandran and Sanjay Vashee
Nicolette Maragh Technical Improvements of Sample Preparation for Proteome Analysis Yanbao Yu
Claudia Najera (GSP fellow) Using Synthetic Biology to Engineer Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Lauren Oldfield and Sanjay Vashee
Erica Ngouajio (GSP fellow) Developing a method to optimize sequencing of the Zika virus genomic termini Kari Dilley and Reed Shabman
Tayah Bolt (GSP fellow) Reduction of GUS Activity in Phaeodactylum via Episomal hpRNA Expression Philip Weyman
Alexandra Rocha (GSP fellow) Fibronectin and LRG1 protein interactions in T1D patients Rajagopala Venkatappa
Emily Samuels (GSP fellow) Cloning and Expression of proteins in Zika Virus and Legionella pneumophila in E. coli Keehwan Kwon
Rolande Tra Lou (GSP fellow) Filovirus-human protein-protein interaction Reed Shabman and Rajagopala Venkatappa
Carolina Hatanpaa Constructing a Novel Hidden Markov Model for a tRNA Binding Domain Architecture in the Minimal Cell Granger Sutton and David Haft

Genomic Workshop for Native American College students

A Genomic Science Workshop was held  last week (May 24-26, 2016) at the J Craig Venter Institute Rockville campus for a group of ten Native American college students.  The students participated in two full-day intensive training activities learning how to study the “microbiome” of natural water sources. Each student had the chance to perform hands-on lab work including DNA isolation from an environmental water source, PCR of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, and gel electrophoresis. Individual computer workstations were provided for the computer lab sessions for students to follow along.  The group was introduced to basic Linux command-line analysis and the popular 16S analysis package QIIME. Overall, the workshop provided the students a foundation of knowledge and tools to identify and classify microbial populations in environmental water sources, and enabled the students to participate in water quality analysis and monitoring efforts of their homeland reservations.

Collage from Maize Cell Genomics Workshop for Undergraduates

Collage from Genomic Workshop for Native American College students

The workshop students were welcomed by JCVI President Karen Nelson and Rockville Campus Director Rembert Pieper. Informal discussion panels were also held to provide networking and research career development opportunities with invited guest speakers including Science Education Directors from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), and Native research scholars from the National Institute of Health (NIH). The students were also presented with a preview of the astronaut microbiomes as an application of human microbiome study. Workshop students also had the opportunity to visit the US Capitol and the National Museum of the American Indian.

The workshop was funded by the National Science Foundation through a Maize Cell Genomics grant and was organized by Agnes Chan (JCVI; co-PI), in collaboration with the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL; PI Dave Jackson, Outreach Educator Joslynn Lee), the University of Wyoming (UW; co-PI Ann Sylvester), Montana State University (Mari Eggers), and the Little Big Horn College (LBHC; John Doyle).  LBHC is a tribal college located in the Crow Reservation, MT. The NSF Maize project has established a long-term outreach relationship with LBHC, and has organized a number of training workshops for Native students previously at LBHC, UW, and CSHL. Participants for the 2016 workshop included Native students recruited from the LBHC, Montana State University, Fort Lewis College, and Northern Arizona State University.

The PIs of the Maize Genomics Project would like to express sincere thanks to instructors from JCVI including Hernan Lorenzi, Yongwook Choi, Vivek Krishnakumar, Stephanie Mounaud,  the JCVI Information Technology team, the Administrative Assistant team, and all colleagues for their generous assistance, support, and patience for a successful outreach educational workshop.

To find out more information on workshop schedule, notes, and manuals, please visit the Maize Cell Genomics project web site at http://maize.jcvi.org/cellgenomics/2016_pcr.php.

Durban Microbiome Workshop

As part of our continued effort to bring genomics to other communities, Alex Voorhies, Derek Harkins and Andres Gomez traveled to Durban, South Africa to lead a series of workshops on microbiome data analyses.  The two days of presentations were made to students, postdocs and faculty at the Durban University of Technology, and was co-sponsored by the NIAID funded JCVI Genomic Center for Infectious Disease.  On day one, the JCVI team provided an introductory lecture on microbiomes and technical considerations to plan and conduct microbiome related projects. The lecture followed up with an introduction to sequencing technologies and bioinformatics tools to analyze 16S rRNA next generation sequencing data.  The day one session ended up with a lecture on the differences between metagenomics and 16S rRNA sequencing and analyses pipelines and one on one advising with students and faculty on how to analyze and plan their own projects.

On day two the JCVI team provided a hands-on tutorial where students analyzed a time series of mouse microbiome data.  Students learned each step of working with a 16S rRNA dataset, from processing raw reads to statistical analysis and figure generation.  The morning started with a practical exercise processing 16S reads using mothur to assign taxonomic classification.  In the afternoon students used the output from the mothur workshop to learn about analyzing data in R.  Students explored alpha and beta diversity as well as indicator species analysis and statistical significance of their findings.  The hands-on workshop concluded with various ways to display 16S microbiome data in publication quality figures.

The students were very enthusiastic and active participants in the lectures and hands on units. It is our sincere hope that the workshop helps them to expand their research and data analysis capabilities in the future.

Our hosts, Drs. Suren Singh and Nokuthula Mchunu, sent along nice messages in appreciation for the event:

Have no words to pass the amount of appreciation the student and the supervisors had for the workshop. Andres, Derek and Alex were fantastic in the delivery of the material and having time to address every question we were asking. We hope that we can have another sometime in the future and if we had choice we would pick them. Thank you again.
– Dr. Nokuthula Mchunu

Thank you for sending out a wonderful, and extremely knowledgeable team to ignite one of many workshops at DUT. It was truly a great exposure for many of my students and staff. They enjoyed the theoretical and hands on sessions alike. Let’s continue this association for many more years ahead.

– Dr. Suren Singh

What Does It Really Mean to Be a Scientist?

In the spring of 2016, JCVI partnered with Del Lago Academy to provide internships for some of its students.

Junior Stephanie Mountain shares about her experience and what her time at JCVI taught her:

Being an intern at JCVI was an amazing experience I will never forget. I learned so much through this internship that I would have been unable to learn in school. I learned a lot about coding and the importance of using computers to analyze data that is generated in the lab. Through my classes at Del Lago I had a good amount of hands on lab experience, but this internship was completely different than anything else I had done previously. It exposed me to the opposite side of scientific research, the kind that isn’t in the lab. I had very minimal computer skills at the start, but now I know how to run command prompt, a little bit on two coding languages, R and Perl, and how to use the Mothur program to run data analysis.

Stephanie with her JCVI mentors, Drs. Zhong and Zhu, and her Del Lago teacher Marc Kibler.

Stephanie with her JCVI mentors, Drs. Zhong and Zhu, and her Del Lago teacher Marc Kibler.

It was really fun to work with my mentors and “help” them analyze their data. Granted, they probably could have done everything much faster and with less problems than me, but it helped me see what happens in a day of the life of a researcher. Before this internship, I wanted to be a scientific researcher, but in my mind that meant doing strictly wet lab stuff. Now, I know that being a scientific researcher means a lot more than I had previously though. All of the computer stuff I did was really fun and cool, and it kind of surprised me how much math was involved in all of the computer things. I’m definitely going to take some computer science classes in college if I get the opportunity to. The math associated with computers seems really challenging and fun, and a lot less like a black box where I press buttons and the computer gives me stuff I want.

Overall, this internship has been eye opening to a new side of scientific research I didn’t know existed. All of the things I learned were really interesting and new. I now know that I really would love to be a scientific researcher in the future.

Junior Janine Vasquez worked with Dr. Orianna Bretschger, Dr. Sofia Babanova, and Jason Jones to research the development of microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment. One big part of that research…pig poop!

I first want to thank everyone for allowing us to have the privilege to work with JCVI. I learned so much throughout this internship and I was able to get a lot of hands-on experience. During this internship, I learned the process of collecting data, running tests and analyzing the results. Our project was to run COD tests to see how different amounts of NaCL would affect the COD readings.

When we first arrived at the farm at San Pasqual, I did not know what I would be doing. When I found out that one of my tasks was to blend pig feces, I was really surprised. At first it was hard because I was still getting used to the smell but after a while, I surprisingly was not bothered by the fact that I was blending pig feces in a blender. I really enjoyed getting the experience of working in the farm and the lab. Some of my friends who also worked in a lab setting only got one side of the experience. Anabel and I were able to experience more than one working setting and I found that interesting.

One thing that I felt was kind of challenging was actually meeting new people. I am not really a social person but I tried to get out of my comfort zone; in the end, I got to meet great people. This internship really made me think about my future. I’ve always had this mindset that people in this industry only work in labs all day and I realized that is not true. I was actually relieved to find out that projects like these have you working in all kinds of places because I like trying different things and working in different work settings. This experience made me realize that this is something that I may want to do in the future.

JCVI is committed to helping youth pursue careers in science. To join our efforts, please contact Education Manager Amani Rushing at arushing@jcvi.org.