Posts by JCVI Staff

Durban Microbiome Workshop

As part of our continued effort to bring genomics to other communities, Alex Voorhies, Derek Harkins and Andres Gomez traveled to Durban, South Africa to lead a series of workshops on microbiome data analyses.  The two days of presentations were made to students, postdocs and faculty at the Durban University of Technology, and was co-sponsored by the NIAID funded JCVI Genomic Center for Infectious Disease.  On day one, the JCVI team provided an introductory lecture on microbiomes and technical considerations to plan and conduct microbiome related projects. The lecture followed up with an introduction to sequencing technologies and bioinformatics tools to analyze 16S rRNA next generation sequencing data.  The day one session ended up with a lecture on the differences between metagenomics and 16S rRNA sequencing and analyses pipelines and one on one advising with students and faculty on how to analyze and plan their own projects.

On day two the JCVI team provided a hands-on tutorial where students analyzed a time series of mouse microbiome data.  Students learned each step of working with a 16S rRNA dataset, from processing raw reads to statistical analysis and figure generation.  The morning started with a practical exercise processing 16S reads using mothur to assign taxonomic classification.  In the afternoon students used the output from the mothur workshop to learn about analyzing data in R.  Students explored alpha and beta diversity as well as indicator species analysis and statistical significance of their findings.  The hands-on workshop concluded with various ways to display 16S microbiome data in publication quality figures.

The students were very enthusiastic and active participants in the lectures and hands on units. It is our sincere hope that the workshop helps them to expand their research and data analysis capabilities in the future.

Our hosts, Drs. Suren Singh and Nokuthula Mchunu, sent along nice messages in appreciation for the event:

Have no words to pass the amount of appreciation the student and the supervisors had for the workshop. Andres, Derek and Alex were fantastic in the delivery of the material and having time to address every question we were asking. We hope that we can have another sometime in the future and if we had choice we would pick them. Thank you again.
– Dr. Nokuthula Mchunu

Thank you for sending out a wonderful, and extremely knowledgeable team to ignite one of many workshops at DUT. It was truly a great exposure for many of my students and staff. They enjoyed the theoretical and hands on sessions alike. Let’s continue this association for many more years ahead.

– Dr. Suren Singh

What Does It Really Mean to Be a Scientist?

In the spring of 2016, JCVI partnered with Del Lago Academy to provide internships for some of its students.

Junior Stephanie Mountain shares about her experience and what her time at JCVI taught her:

Being an intern at JCVI was an amazing experience I will never forget. I learned so much through this internship that I would have been unable to learn in school. I learned a lot about coding and the importance of using computers to analyze data that is generated in the lab. Through my classes at Del Lago I had a good amount of hands on lab experience, but this internship was completely different than anything else I had done previously. It exposed me to the opposite side of scientific research, the kind that isn’t in the lab. I had very minimal computer skills at the start, but now I know how to run command prompt, a little bit on two coding languages, R and Perl, and how to use the Mothur program to run data analysis.

Stephanie with her JCVI mentors, Drs. Zhong and Zhu, and her Del Lago teacher Marc Kibler.

Stephanie with her JCVI mentors, Drs. Zhong and Zhu, and her Del Lago teacher Marc Kibler.

It was really fun to work with my mentors and “help” them analyze their data. Granted, they probably could have done everything much faster and with less problems than me, but it helped me see what happens in a day of the life of a researcher. Before this internship, I wanted to be a scientific researcher, but in my mind that meant doing strictly wet lab stuff. Now, I know that being a scientific researcher means a lot more than I had previously though. All of the computer stuff I did was really fun and cool, and it kind of surprised me how much math was involved in all of the computer things. I’m definitely going to take some computer science classes in college if I get the opportunity to. The math associated with computers seems really challenging and fun, and a lot less like a black box where I press buttons and the computer gives me stuff I want.

Overall, this internship has been eye opening to a new side of scientific research I didn’t know existed. All of the things I learned were really interesting and new. I now know that I really would love to be a scientific researcher in the future.

Junior Janine Vasquez worked with Dr. Orianna Bretschger, Dr. Sofia Babanova, and Jason Jones to research the development of microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment. One big part of that research…pig poop!

I first want to thank everyone for allowing us to have the privilege to work with JCVI. I learned so much throughout this internship and I was able to get a lot of hands-on experience. During this internship, I learned the process of collecting data, running tests and analyzing the results. Our project was to run COD tests to see how different amounts of NaCL would affect the COD readings.

When we first arrived at the farm at San Pasqual, I did not know what I would be doing. When I found out that one of my tasks was to blend pig feces, I was really surprised. At first it was hard because I was still getting used to the smell but after a while, I surprisingly was not bothered by the fact that I was blending pig feces in a blender. I really enjoyed getting the experience of working in the farm and the lab. Some of my friends who also worked in a lab setting only got one side of the experience. Anabel and I were able to experience more than one working setting and I found that interesting.

One thing that I felt was kind of challenging was actually meeting new people. I am not really a social person but I tried to get out of my comfort zone; in the end, I got to meet great people. This internship really made me think about my future. I’ve always had this mindset that people in this industry only work in labs all day and I realized that is not true. I was actually relieved to find out that projects like these have you working in all kinds of places because I like trying different things and working in different work settings. This experience made me realize that this is something that I may want to do in the future.

JCVI is committed to helping youth pursue careers in science. To join our efforts, please contact Education Manager Amani Rushing at arushing@jcvi.org.

JCVI’s Scientists Inspire the Next Generation!

JCVI’s Education Program has been working to bring science to life (sometimes literally!) for San Diego’s students.

It started off March 4 with our participation in President Obama’s recently announced science education initiative “Take Your Child to the Lab” week. Nine children of JCVI’s staff visited the Institute for a tour and hands-on science experiment.

The morning started with a talk from JCVI’s La Jolla Campus Director, Mark Adams. Dr. Adams began by asking the kids, “What are you curious about?” This prompted a flurry of enthusiastic responses. “At JCVI,” he continued, “That’s what we – and your parents – do. We’re curious. We ask questions that no one has answered and then we try to figure out answers.”

JCVI scientists Phil Weyman and Nicole Yee talk about synthetic biology and bacteria cultures.

JCVI scientists Phil Weyman and Nicole Yee talk about synthetic biology and bacteria cultures.

Next, the children heard about some of the specific questions we’re asking and answering at JCVI from synthetic biology with Dr. Phillip Weyman to waste water treatment with Kayla Carpenter to bacteria growth and antibiotic testing with Nicole Yee and Manny Torralba. They also went on a tour of JCVI’s sustainable lab led by Dr. Robert Friedman. He helped the children think not only about doing science, but the impact of doing science. “It’s really cool that the building is made out of recycled materials,” said eleven-year old Charlie Myers. “I’ve never seen anything like that!”

Before leaving, our young guests tried their own hands at culturing bacteria by gathering samples from the environment around them. Over the next week they’ll be monitoring their samples to see what happens next!

The children take bacteria samples and show off their experiments.

The children take bacteria samples and show off their experiments.

The San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering

The very next day, JCVI was once again sharing our passion for science with the San Diego community. The JCVI Mobile Lab was one of 143 exhibitors participating in the 2016 San Diego Festival of Science & Engineering’s free Expo Day. Approximately 500 visitors boarded the mobile lab and learned about sequencing, marine microbes, using DNA in forensics, and the human microbiome. Volunteers Andres Gomez, Marcus Jones, Drishti Kaul, Ebony Miller, Aubrie O’Rourke, Joey Steward, Michelle Tull and Angela Zoumpliswowed group after group by sharing about JCVI’s research.

Drishti Kaul and Aubrie O’Rourke guide festival attendees through JCVI’s Mobile Laboratory.

Drishti Kaul and Aubrie O’Rourke guide festival attendees through JCVI’s Mobile Laboratory.

“Can this mobile lab come to my child’s school?” more than one parent wanted to know. The JCVI Education Program would love to make that a reality. Contact Education Manager Amani Rushing at arushing@jcvi.org to talk about supporting the mobile lab your community!

Zoo in You: The Human Microbiome Exhibit Opens in San Diego

On January 28, over 250 scientists, philanthropists and other STEM community notables, including JCVI CEO Council Member Reena Horowitz, came out to support the San Diego premier of the Zoo in You: The Human Microbiome exhibit at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. The Zoo in You is a new 2,000 sq. ft. exhibit funded by a SEPA grant from NIH in partnership with JCVI. Through May 8, 2016 visitors to the display can learn about our constant microbial companions, where they live, how diverse they are, and in what ways scientists are realizing just how important they are to our personal health.

Dr. Karen Nelson

JCVI’s President, Karen Nelson, Ph.D., spoke about JCVI’s passion for STEM education and dedication to encouraging STEM growth in San Diego.

JCVI at Zoo in You Opening

JCVI staff and friends came out to support the event (from left to right): Hernan Lorenzi, Katie Collins, Karen Beeri, Amani Rushing, CEO Council Member Reena Horowitz, Nicole Deberg, Mark Adams.

Thanks to new, sophisticated technology and the cutting-edge research of the National Institutes of Health’s Human Microbiome Project, the world is just starting to discover what the microbes in each of us are up to and how they affect us.

JCVI is taking other steps to help the San Diego community learn about the importance of their microbiomes. In addition to the exhibit, JCVI scientist Karen Beeri led a class of 23 girls in activities about microbes and DNA sequencing at Fleet’s Saturday Science Club for Girls on February 13. The girls toured the Zoo in You exhibit, made DNA bracelets, and used RNA decoders to decode the secret messages found in our amino acids.

Zoo in You: The Human Microbiome will be on display at Fleet until May 8, 2016. Check it out!

For more information about JCVI’s education initiatives, please contact Education Manager Amani Rushing at arushing@jcvi.org.

Scientist Spotlight: Sinem Beyhan, Ph.D.

Sinem Beyhan, Ph.D. recently joined the JCVI team as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Infectious Diseases and is working closely with Dr. Bill Nierman, Director of JCVI’s Infectious Diseases Program to expand our studies on fungal pathogens. Sinem is interested in understanding how pathogenic fungi can sense and respond to their environment and cause disease. Her current focus is investigating how the fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum uses mammalian host temperature as a signal to alter cell morphology and virulence traits to infect human and mammalian hosts.

Dr. Sinem Beyhan

Dr. Sinem Beyhan

Sinem was born in Turkey. At a young age, she was infinitely curious about the world around her, asking how and why at every opportunity. She was a successful student and was supported by her parents and teachers. Sinem’s early exposure to science was limited. Growing up she did not have access to science camps or scientific experimentation in the classroom. Although culturally girls were pushed away from science and engineering studies, Sinem never heard “no” or “you can’t.”   During high school biology she began her exploration of how organisms work. Even though the class was all memorization, Sinem’s teacher encouraged her to ask questions and to study. Sinem attended the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey to study genetics and molecular biology. She decided to focus on microbiology and left Turkey for the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) in 2003.

At UCSC, Sinem would begin her investigation of pathogens. During this time she focused on Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of the disease cholera. Another significant event occurred during her time at UCSC, Sinem met her advisor Dr. Fitnat Yildiz. Dr. Yildiz also happened to be a Turkish woman, and the two researchers clicked immediately. They published 14 papers together. After receiving her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, Sinem decided to stay in the United States. She moved to the University of California, San Francisco for her postdoctoral research. Here, Sinem would be mentored by Dr. Anital Sil, and she would shift her focus to fungal pathogens.

After being mentored by scientists like Drs. Yildiz and Sil, two intelligent women who inspired Sinem and showed her that it is possible to balance research and a family, it is not surprising that Sinem also thrives in the role of adviser. She has mentored students throughout her graduate and postdoctoral posts. In addition to establishing her lab at JCVI, Sinem’s is excited to be part of the training programs at JCVI. She also wants to inspire students and interns to pursue a career in science. Although Sinem jokes that her mother now wishes she had told Sinem “no” when she wanted to leave Turkey (it is challenging being so far from her family), it is clear that our new scientist will continue to encourage her team and interns that they “can.”

In addition to uncovering the mechanisms of fungal pathogens, Sinem is also passionate about running, scuba diving, and playing games with her 1-year-old daughter.

2015: JCVI Marks Another Banner Year

jcvi-timeline-2015

JCVI Promotes Science Literacy in the U.S.

Welcomes New Education Manager Amani Rushing

The issue of our society’s science literacy continues to circulate through the media. Recently, reporters focused on results of the Pew Research Center’s Science Knowledge Quiz, which indicates that most Americans would score a grade of C on a basic science test. The gender and racial gaps revealed by the study were equally discouraging.

“Our planet is in crisis, and we need to mobilize all our intellectual forces to save it. One solution could lie in building a scientifically literate society in order to survive.”-  J. Craig Venter, 2015.

This latest examination of what we know about science literacy follows a report by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2014 that 26 percent of its respondents were unaware the Earth revolves around the sun. Results from that report on the more controversial topics of climate change and evolution also left scientists and science educators cringing.

San Diego High Tech Fair

On board JCVI’s DiscoverGenomics Mobile Lab at the San Diego High Tech Fair 2015

San Diego High Tech Fair

JCVI’s Dr. Orianna Bretschger greet the public at the San Diego High Tech Fair 2015

Rapid developments in science and technology continually raise new questions for the public debate.  JCVI believes that it is critical that today’s students have an understanding of the basic facts and concepts of science. It is equally important that these students have an understanding of how ideas are investigated and analyzed so that they can develop a perspective on any issue up for discussion. We need to cultivate the next generation of scientists, and we need to ensure that these same generations who may not pursue the sciences formally remain informed and knowledgeable voters.

JCVI has been committed to K-12 and teacher science education since 1999 and is expanding its role in addressing the science literacy challenge. We recently hired Amani Rushing as our Education Manager.  Amani, a graduate of Stanford University, comes to JCVI from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). Prior to NCMEC, Amani worked as a Project Coordinator in the Education and Human Resources Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  Amani brings ten years of experience of developing and delivering education and training programs for educators and families. She will continue to expand JCVI’s reputation in the STEM education field and will manage and expand the following JCVI education initiatives:

  • DiscoverGenomics! Mobile Lab (DG!). Established in 2006, DG! is a self-sufficient laboratory/learning center on wheels that provides middle school students and teachers the opportunity to learn current bioscience concepts and to master the use of laboratory equipment.  JCVI is committed to getting DG! back on the road again in San Diego.  We are actively seeking funding for DG! for the 2016/2017 school year.  Your name or corporate logo could be on display as DG! travels to San Diego area schools.
  • Internship Program. The Internship Program provides opportunities to inspire young scientists and other science professionals to work in all areas of the Institute. Interns are assigned to a mentor who is a member of the Institute’s faculty or senior staff. This past summer, JCVI welcomed 24 high school students, college students, and high school science educators to our Rockville and La Jolla campuses. Interns on both coasts worked on fascinating projects on everything from helping to develop a high throughput sequencing and analysis pipeline to establishing a CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system in M. mycoides.
  • Genomics Scholars Program. The Genomics Scholars Program (GSP) is a transition program focusing on the leap from a community college to a four-year college using a combination of activities including undergraduate research experience with mentoring and professional development. Our program incorporates multiple avenues of support for students through a multi-year research experience with the Principal Investigators as mentors, and supplemental professional development provided by the JCVI. Selected students can also participate in undergraduate research conferences.
  • Zoo in You. Zoo in You is a new 2,000 square foot bilingual (English and Spanish) traveling exhibition that will engage visitors in the cutting edge research of the NIH Human Microbiome Project and explore the impact of the microbiome on human health. The first stop on the tour will be the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego, CA in 2016. JCVI will work with Fleet to introduce the exhibit to the San Diego community and raise public understanding of the science behind the microbiome.

For more information about our efforts and opportunities to partner with JCVI, please contact Amani Rushing at arushing@jcvi.org.

JCVI’s Global Voyage of Discovery Continues

Global Ocean Sampling Expedition Planned for 2016

Over the past 12 years, JCVI’s Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Expedition has continued to explore all of the world’s oceans, along with major inland seas such as the Baltic and Mediterranean.  The research team maintains ongoing sampling in the waters off of California and in extreme conditions such as Antarctica and the Amazon River.  JCVI’s effort is the largest marine microbial study to date, quantifying both the taxonomic and functional diversity of microbes within these environments, and examining how both the natural environment and humans shape these communities.

Planned 2016 route for the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition

Planned 2016 route for the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition

The scientific goals and ideas on the first Sorcerer II Expedition sprung from the sequencing and analysis of Methanococcus jannaschii by Dr. Craig Venter and his research team after the organism was isolated from a hot, deep-sea vent in the Pacific.  M. jannaschii is from the Archeal branch of life and is also known as an autotroph, in that it makes all it needs for survival from carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen in water. Dr. Venter and the team continue to believe that the unknown and unseen world in the oceans is vital to understanding diversity on the planet and potentially holds the key to solving growing environmental issues.

The deck of the Sorcerer II is equipped with scientific tools including advanced water filtration and communications systems.

The deck of the Sorcerer II is equipped with scientific tools including advanced water filtration and communications systems.

Past GOS efforts have been funded by The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Beyster Family Foundation Fund, Life Technologies, and additional anonymous donors. To date, the GOS team has analyzed billions of DNA sequences and discovered over a billion new genes, 1700 unique protein families, and assembled dozens of whole genomes for uncultivated microbes.  The GOS data are freely available to the public and have resulted in follow-on research across several fields by scientists worldwide.   The GOS team utilizes a shotgun metagenomics technique to examine the presence and possible role of microbes in open ocean ecosystems.  JCVI has ongoing research internally and with international collaborators to characterize the unexplored microbiomes of marine, estuarine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments around the world.

Highlights of past and present expeditions:

  • The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation was a significant funder of the first phase of the GOS Expedition from 2004-2006. To date, there are 41 publications from this phase, and an evaluation of the scientific impact of their support shows that these publications have been cited over 2700 times.
  • During the J. Robert Beyster and Life Technologies Foundation 2009-2010 Research Voyage of the Sorcerer II Expedition, aquatic samples were collected by filtration from over 300 aquatic environments in 12 nations and international waters, resulting in over 1100 possible metagenomic samples. The data generated has fostered collaborative projects between JCVI and institutions in eight nations and formed the focus of nine postdoctoral projects and five graduate student theses. The expedition extensively cataloged the microbial diversity and function of nearly all global oceans and marginal seas, and has further developed a mechanistic understanding for the distribution of microbes and function that can be applied to all aquatic environments.
  • In 2014, JCVI embarked on a sampling expedition of the Amazon River and its tributaries, which contains 1/5th of the Earth’s river flow. Long recognized for the biodiversity of visible organisms, the Amazon is understudied with regards to the diversity of microorganisms and the goal of this effort is to continue to increase our understanding of the biological diversity of Earth.
  • Since 2008, JCVI scientists have traveled to the continent of Antarctica. As one of the most untouched regions on the planet and home to the world’s largest marine ecosystem, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are invaluable to JCVI research involving climate change. Major objectives of the fieldwork are to understand how changes in micronutrient availability, temperature, and pCO2 impact growth, community composition, and nutrient utilization in Southern Ocean phytoplankton.  Recently JCVI researchers in collaboration with Scripps Institute of Oceanography uncovered a series of complicated relationships among marine microbes in their fight for important resources, like vitamin B12, that has critical consequences for coastal Southern Ocean food webs. Scientists at J. Craig Venter Institute, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Other Collaborators, Publish Paper Outlining New View of Microbial Relationships in Southern Ocean Phytoplankton Blooms.

2016 Global Sampling Expedition Addresses Plastic Pollution & Environmental Policy

The planned 2016 GOS Expedition, led by Chris Dupont, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, combines the basic science approaches of previous expeditions with applied science. The team plans to study the wide variety of marine protected areas (MPAs) found throughout the Caribbean Sea, the Florida Straits, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Sea of Cortez. The goal is to profile the ecosystem health of the MPAs and the impact to them by fishing, pollution, habitat degradation and climate change. With dramatic differences in the levels of protection of various MPAs, JCVI researchers will assess the conservation strategy of each MPA then evaluate the outcomes of those strategies on a microbial level, with the goal of making policy recommendations for better ocean preservation.

Chris also proposes to examine the microbes found on plastic pollution in the ocean.  Plastic is the most common type of marine litter in the world, and it is wreaking untold havoc on marine ecosystems. This pollution, currently 50 million metric tons per year, has been examined by JCVI researchers and collaborators in preliminary studies, and they have found that these plastics harbor microbes that are not normally found to be abundant in the ocean. With 100 million tons of plastic in the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch”—visualize Texas covered with plastic and floating in the Pacific Ocean, —there is a real and timely need to address the declining health of our oceans. Chris hopes that this research will not only further characterize what microbes are found on plastic pollution, but will also provide the genomic information necessary for building designer microorganisms for the biological degradation and recovery of plastic waste

Exploring the microbes of the oceans is even more exciting and promising than it was when JCVI launched the Sorcerer II Expedition from Halifax, Nova Scotia in August 2003. Each JCVI expedition has led to new discoveries that have deepened our understanding of the world’s waters.  What else will we discover in the coming months and years?  Whatever it may be, count on JCVI being at the forefront of the discovery.  There are many ways that you can support the next phase of discovery and help JCVI scientists find solutions to these environmental challenges.   For more information about our GOS expeditions, as well as details on partner opportunities for our 2016/2017 voyages, please contact Katie Collins, kcollins@jcvi.org.

JCVI Gala “2015: A Genome Odyssey” Celebrates Discovery

On October 24th, JCVI welcomed 200 guests to our third annual gala “2015: A Genome Odyssey.”  Our annual gala has become a signature La Jolla event, and this year’s guests were not disappointed.  Guests experienced an evening odyssey through land, sea and space interacting with JCVI scientists to learn first-hand what explorations are happening today.  Proceeds from the gala will support JCVI’s Innovation Fund.

As in past galas, our research was the focus. Guests learned how scientists Chris Dupont, Ph.D. and Jeff Hoffman collect, filter and analyze the organisms we find as part of our Global Ocean Sampling Expedition. They also saw a demonstration by Orianna Bretschger, Ph.D. on how microbial fuel cells can be used to clean wastewater streams.

JCVI Global Ocean Sampling scientist Jeff Hoffman demonstrates the filtration process used on board Sorcerer II.

JCVI Global Ocean Sampling scientist Jeff Hoffman demonstrates the filtration process used on board Sorcerer II.

Orianna Bretschger, PhD, explains how microbial fuel cell technology hef lab developed works.

Orianna Bretschger, PhD, explains how microbial fuel cell technology her lab developed works.

During the dinner program, Craig Venter, Ph.D. and Board Vice Chairman Erling Norrby, M.D., Ph.D. led guests through our timeline of discovery over the past 20 years. Craig also celebrated the career of Hamilton O. Smith. M.D., JCVI Distinguished Professor and Scientific Director, and presented him with JCVI’s inaugural Innovation Award.  Throughout his career, Ham has been at the forefront of discoveries that have advanced the field of molecular biology.  Ham received the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for “discoveries with far reaching consequences for genetics.”  His methods have indeed led to innumerable breakthroughs by scientists around the globe, and his own work has led to some of the most profound discoveries in modern science.

Dr. J. Craig Venter presents JCVI's Innovation Award to Dr. Hamilton Smith.

Dr. J. Craig Venter presents JCVI’s Innovation Award to Dr. Hamilton Smith.

All attendees agreed it was another beautiful and inspiring evening. Thank you to event sponsors BioMed Realty, CapitalOne, Human Longevity, Inc., Synthetic Genomics, NuVasive, CBRE, JLL, Rady Children’s Hospital Foundation, Celgene, Reena Horowitz, Iris and Matt Strauss and the Beyster Family Foundation Fund.  Guests also delighted in our gift bags again this year.  Sponsored by Kowalski Communications, the Esperos backpack was filled with donations from Tata Harper, Blue Lizard, Health Warrior, La Fresh, Thrive Market, Moon Cheese, Aromaflage, Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa, The Lodge Torrey Pines, Rite in the Rain and Waters Fine Foods & Catering.

Thank you to our Gift Bag Sponsors!

Thank you to our Gift Bag Sponsors!

For more information on JCVI’s 2016 gala, please contact Katie Collins at kcollins@jcvi.org.

June Grant Update

Congratulations to our JCVI Principal Investigators for the several successful grants that were awarded or that we received notification of in the month of June. All of the following PIs received official confirmation of awards to be made to them. Christopher Dupont, John Glass, Granger Sutton, Daniel Gibson, Charles Merryman, Rembert Pieper, Richard Scheuermann, Christopher Town, Reed Shabman, Orianna Bretschger, Sanjay Vashee and Sarah Highlander to the sum of $6,365,099. The topics of these awards ranged from synthetic approaches to studying the human microbiome, vaccine development, protein modeling, studies on tuberculosis strain diversity, and immune profiling.

Of notable mention are the awards to be made to Sanjay Vashee $1,879,282 from the NSF (BREAD supplement that will allow for an extension of the current program focused on developing a synthetic vaccine for Bovine pleuropneumonia), Reed Shabman from DHS ($1,135,654; The development and validation of sequence subtraction databases to improve virus discovery through next generation sequencing – special acknowledgement to Tim Stockwell and Derek Harkins for their contributions to this proposal), and to Chris Town from NSF ($883,704; Federated Plant Data Base Initiative for Legumes).

A sincere Congratulations to the team.